The Family of John N. Long
and Lucinda Whitten

INTRODUCTION

This page last updated August 9, 1009.

The story of Lucinda A. Whitten and John N. Long has become a personal fascination for me. Their story is one of my family's deepest mysteries, and sometimes I feel as if I am the only person left who even knows they existed. Evidence suggests that both John and Lucinda died in mid-life, leaving two orphaned daughters. It is these two orphaned daughters that has kept me awake for hours at night at times, wondering what became of these children. I appreciate any insight my readers can offer!

Lucinda A. Whitten was the third child and first daughter of Pleasant W. Whitten and Caroline Spencer. Property records suggest that Pleasant and Caroline arrived in Winston County, Mississippi around September 1848, and Lucinda was listed as one year of age in September 1850 with her birthplace as Mississippi. I believe she was born in 1849 in Winston County, the first child of her family born in their new home. When she was approximately 18 years old, Lucinda married John N. Long, a man 14 years her senior. Lucinda and John were married on January 22, 1867 in Winston County, one weekend before her older brother James would wed.

Who was the John Long that Lucinda married? Years ago a genealogy friend of mine shared with me an obituary he had from April 1896 for a Mr. Jno. Long, husband of Lucinda Whitten. The obituary gave this information: "He was born in Union District, S.C., July 13, 1836, became a citizen of Miss. in 1850. He united in marriage with Miss Lucinda Whitten January 22, 1867. He professed faith in Christ and was baptised into the membership of the Methodist Church about 25 years ago" [MKJ note: about 1871]. Based on my interpretation of census data, I believe the John Long that married Lucinda Whitten was a son of John and Jane Long of South Carolina (most likely Union District). If so, his siblings would have been Henry W. Long (also known to be from Union District, South Carolina), Letty Long (who married Samuel Hames), and Elizabeth Long (who married George S. Hood). It appears that the family migrated from Union District, South Carolina to Winston County, Mississippi in time to be listed on the 1850 Winston Census, but they were listed with surname Lowrey instead of Long. Then it appears that father John died circa 1852. In the Winston County Probate Record of 1851-1853, pg. 291, there is listed the will of a John Lang. The records mention his son John (under 21 yrs), daughter Letty, daughter Elizabeth, son Henry, and wife Jane Lang. The record was given July 30, 1852 and witnessed by J.P. Jeffers, M.C. Gage, and G.S. Hood. Then I finally found the breakthrough I had been seeking for years. I found who I believe to be "my" John Long on the 1860 census. It appears that he was listed with his widowed mother Jane (as head of household), brother H.W. (Henry) and widowed sister Mary Bailey with her three young children.

When the War Between The States began, John and his brother Henry both joined the Confederate Cause. Henry enlisted on April 10, 1862 at Vaiden, Mississippi; and John enlisted on Sept 5, 1862 at Senatobia, Mississippi. Both men were assigned to Company A of the 2nd Partisan Rangers as privates in Ballentine's Regiment of Cavalry. The Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations From the States of Mississippi (Microcopy 269 Roll 18) provides a short history of the 2nd Partisan Rangers:

This company was mustered into state service Feb 10, 1862 and into the Confederate Service Apr 10, 1862. It was transferred from Col R.A. Stewart's Legion to Col. Ballentine's Regiment Aug 26, 1862. In July 1862, Capt. J.G. Ballentine was ordered by Brig. Gen. Villepigue who was then commanding in North MS to collect and form into a regiment all independent and unattached companies then on duty in that department. The regiment was formed of 6 MS companies and one MS/TN company; 2 MS companies and one LA company were added in Oct 1862, and one TN company was added in Dec 1862. In Aug 1863, the regiment was reduced to ten companies by the consolidation of companies D and F. The organization was known as Ballentine's Regiment of Cavalry in the field. It was designated the 2nd Regiment MS Partisan Rangers on records of the Confederate War Department.
The company muster rolls provide this service information for John and Henry: Richard P. Long also served in Company A of the 2nd Partisan Rangers and enlisted at the same time as Henry on April 10, 1862 at Vaiden. Perhaps he was a cousin?

In addition to the 2nd Partisan Rangers, the Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations From the States of Mississippi (Microcopy 269 Roll 34) shows records for J.N. Long and H.W. Long in the 7th MS Cavalry, Company A.

Long, J.N. -- 7th MS Cavalry, Co. A - private - Residence Winston County -Appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War of Co. A, 7th MS Regiment, Confederate States Army, commanded by Capt. R.R. Brewer, surrendered at Citronelle, Ala by Lieut. Gen. R. Taylor, CSA to Maj. Gen. E.R.S. Canby, USA, May 4, 1865, and paroled at Grenada, Miss. May 20, 1865. Roll dated Grenada, Miss., May 20, 1865.
 
Long, H.W. -- 7th MS Cavalry, Co. A - private - residence = Winston County - Appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War captured at points between Chickasaw Landing and Macon, GA from March 22 to April 20, 1865, inclusive, and turned over to Capt. W.B. Gates, Provost Marshal, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps MDM. Roll not dated. Where captured=Selma Ala. When captured=April 2, 1865.
 
Appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War of Co. A, 7th MS Regiment, Confederate States Army, commanded by Capt. R.R. Brewer, surrendered at Citronelle, Ala by Lieut. Gen. R. Taylor, CSA to Maj. Gen. E.R.S. Canby, USA, May 4, 1865, and paroled at Grenada, Miss. May 20, 1865. Roll dated Grenada, Miss., May 20, 1865.
So it seems that Henry was captured at Selma, Alabama in April 1865. John was also captured, but the time and place is uncertain. He was likely captured at the same time and place as Henry. They were surrendered at Citronelle, Alabama on May 4, 1865 and paroled two weeks later at Grenada, Mississippi.

After the War ended, both John and Henry returned home to Winston County, Mississippi. John married Lucinda Whitten in January 1867, but I have not been able to find him or Lucinda on either the 1870 or 1880 censuses of Winston County. Henry became a prosperous farmer and married Dolly Clark in 1870. John and Henry apparently had neighboring farms. For more information on Henry's family, see The Family of John and Jane Long.

The next records I have been able to find of John and Lucinda Long are in the form of land deeds in Winston County, Mississippi. Note the following:

The only other land deed I want to mention here is what was for a long time a rather mysterious land deed in 1891 for a Mrs. Lucy A. Long in Neshoba County, Mississippi. It is recorded in Winston County, Mississippi in deed 09-389, dated January 22, 1891 and says that J.L and R.E. Chandler of Winston County gave deed to Mrs. Lucy A. Long of Neshoba County for $400 for land at W2 of NE4 and W2 of E2 of NE4 of S28 T13 R12E, 120 ac. Recorded 8 Aug 1891. The location of this land is in the southern part of Winston County, quite removed from the other pieces of land in the northern part of the county whose deeds mention Lucinda Long. For a long time I wondered if this Lucy A. Long was "mine", but thanks to Ruth Long Menhel, I now believe this Lucy A. Long was actually the wife of George Washington Long, son of James Long and Susanna Parks. According to Ruth, George Washington Long married Lucinda Gary. Oh well, at least now I can stop worrying about Neshoba County.

Other than the land deeds mentioned above, there is little surviving evidence of the lives of John and Lucinda Long. However, recently I discovered that Lucinda suffered from some form of mental illness. A few years ago, my friend Louis Taunton published a book of excerpts from Winston County's newspaper in the 1880's and 1890's, The Winston Signal. In the issue dated October 19, 1889, the paper reported the following: "Mr. John LONG'S wife who had been declared a lunatic, was taken to the insane asylum at Meridian last week by Sheriff HATHORN." Then in the issue dated October 26, 1889, the paper reported this follow-up report: "Mrs. LONG, wife of Mr. J. LONG, who lives several miles north of town, attempted to commit suicide one night last week by cutting her throat. Her mind had been wrong for several days, and she was no doubt in a state of temporary insanity when she made the attempt. The doctors say while the wound is serious, but not considered critically fatal." According to patient admission records for the East Mississippi Insane Asylum in Meridian, Mississippi from 1885-1926, there was a Mrs. Missie Long of Winston County who was admitted on October 10, 1889 and who suffered from acute mania. Missie was a housewife with two children. She was discharged three months later on January 6, 1890 in "Unimproved" condition.

I suspect this Mrs. Missie Long is my Lucinda Long. These types of mental infirmaries seemed to run in the family of Lucinda's mother, Caroline Spencer. Lucinda's sister Jane Stark was also hospitalized in Meridian earlier that same year in March 1889. Jane suffered from chronic mania. Lucinda's mother had a sister Lucinda Spencer who may have suffered similarly. See The Family of Wiley G. and Nancy Spencer for information on Lucinda Spencer.

But I still do not know when "my" Lucinda A. Whitten Long died. If Lucinda is the Missie Long described above, then she was released from the insane asylum on January 6, 1890 and likely returned home to her family. The obituary for her husband John, listed in the April 3, 1896 issue of the Winston County Journal newspaper, gives his death date as March 13, 1896 and states, "He leaves two motherless girls to mourn for him. The funeral services took place on Sunday morning at Antioch Church, 3 miles from Webster, Rev. Dollar conducting the service. Tenderly and lovingly they bore his body and laid it in his grave beside his sleeping wife, to rest 'til the resurrection..." My current assumption is that she died after January 1890 but before March 1896. If I am correct, she would have been between 40 and 47 years old.

But what about the "two motherless girls" left orphaned by John's death? Now that is the real mystery. I have always maintained that these girls must have been adopted by family or friends in the community, but I was never able to prove it. Thanks to fellow researcher Billy Weeks, I was finally able to get enough information to substantiate my theory.

Billy Weeks explained the following to me. Mary Bailey, sister to John and Henry Long, had a son named John R. Bailey. On the 1900 census of Choctaw County, Mississippi, John Bailey, then a widower, listed as members of his household his two daughters Lennie and Minnie, his mother Mary Bailey, a household servant William Carr, and two female cousins Lummie and Mary Long. Lummie was listed as age 26, born November 1873. Mary was listed as ten years younger, age 17, born April 1883. My theory is that John Bailey and his mother Mary took in Lummie and Mary after their father John Long died in 1896.

There are two additional clues that support my theory that Mary and Lummie Long were the daughters of John N. and Lucinda Long. The first is an old family rumor. Lucinda had a brother named Jack Whitten who had a daughter named Lummie who was born in January 1892. When I first began researching the Whittens seriously back in 1984, one of Lummie's grandchildren asked me if I had ever heard a rumor about Lummie perhaps being adopted. Having just recently begun to research my family history, I had not heard any such rumors and was unable to substantiate it through subsequent conversations with older members of the family. But in 1998, a conversation with another Whitten cousin revealed that she had also heard a rumor about Lummie being adopted. I began to wonder if Jack's daughter Lummie could perhaps have been a daughter of Lucinda and John Long. I now believe that Jack's daughter Lummie really was his daughter after all, and the Lummie who was adopted was really Lucinda's daughter.

The second clue came in the form of Winston County Chancery Court minutes from 1918. In short, Lucinda's brother John Thomas Whitten had a son named Jack Jr. who sued all of the heirs of his late uncle Jack Sr., as well as his other aunts and uncles, for reimbursement of back taxes owed on land inherited from the estate of his grandfather Pleasant Whitten. One of the people listed in the lawsuit was a Mrs. Mary Crosby. I wondered for years who this Mary Crosby person was until Billy Weeks again helped me solve the mystery. Billy explained that Mary Crosby was the wife of M.L. "Luther" Crosby, the youngest child of William O. Crosby. In 1900, he was listed in the census as 19 years old and living with his parents. His birth date was given as April 1881. The Mary Long, listed in the 1900 household of John R. Bailey with a birth date of April 1883, would be the right age to be the Mary Crosby, wife of Luther Crosby. A check of the marriage records for Choctaw County, Mississippi showed a marriage record dated December 2, 1901, for M. L. Crosby and Miss Mary Long. The witness in the application for the marriage license on December 2 was O. L. Shaw. The marriage was performed on December 2 by minister G. W. Gordon. I feel confident that the Mary Long who married M.L. Crosby is the same Mary Crosby listed in the 1918 Whitten family lawsuit.

It seems that many years of searching for the orphaned daughters of John and Lucinda Long have finally paid off. Nothing else is known about Lummie Long except her name, but I feel better just knowing that much. Perhaps a visitor to this site will be able to contribute more information on these two long-lost Long-Whitten descendants.

FAMILY TREE

John N. Long
Born: July 13, 1836 in Union District, South Carolina
Married: January 22, 1867 in Winston County, Mississippi
Died: March 13, 1896 in Winston County, Mississippi
Buried: Antioch Cemetery, Winston County, Mississippi (unmarked or marked only with a sandstone rock)
Father: John Long
Mother: Jane Long
-------------------------------------------------------------

Lucinda A. Whitten
Born: 1849 in Mississippi, probably in Winston County
Died: Between 1890 - 1896, probably in in Winston County, Mississippi
Buried: Antioch Cemetery, Winston County, Mississippi (unmarked or marked only with a sandstone rock)
Father: Pleasant William Whitten
Mother: Caroline Spencer
-------------------------------------------------------------

  1. Lummie Long
    Born: November 1873, probably in Winston County, Mississippi
    Died: Unknown, but after 1900

    Lummie and her sister Mary were listed in the household of first cousin John R. Bailey on the 1900 census of Choctaw County, Mississippi. No other information about her is known at this time.

  2. Mary Pearl Long
    Born: April 1883, probably in Winston County, Mississippi
    Married: December 2, 1901 in Choctaw County, Mississippi
    Spouse: Martin Luther Crosby
    Died: Unknown, but after 1920
    Buried: Unknown

    I have been unable to locate Mary and Luther Crosby on the 1910 census in Mississippi, but the 1920 census of Choctaw County, Mississippi shows the following information:

    Supervisor District 4, Enumeration District 6, Sheet 7A, Page 111, Town of Ackerman, 1/16/1920:
    Crosby, M.L., head, rents, age 38 (b. about 1882), born MS, parents born MS, job = telephone exchange
    Crosby, M.P., wife, age 36 (b. about 1884), born MS, parents born MS, no employment
    Crosby, Chester, son, age 17 (b. about 1893), born MS
    Crosby, John, son, age 9 (b. about 1911), born MS
    Crosby, M.E., daughter, age 7 (b. about 1913), born MS
    Crosby, M.L., son, age 2 (b. about 1918), born MS

    Luther's World War I draft registration card (dated September 11, 1918) lists the following information:

    Serial Number: 54; Order Number: 142; Card Number: 502
    1. Name: Martin Luther Crosby
    2. Permanent Home Address: Houston, Chickasaw, Miss.
    3. Age in Years: 37
    4. Date of Birth: April 25, 1881
    5-9. Race: White
    10-15. U.S. Citizen: Native Born
    16. Present Occupation: Telephone
    17-18. Employer's Name: Cum. Tel. & Tel. Grapch Co.
    19. Nearest Relative: Mary Pearl Crosby, Houston, Miss.

FAMILY HISTORY

1850 Winston County, Mississippi Census:
Sept 11, 1850, Subdivision No. 22, Pg 335B, House/Family 281/284:
Whitten, Lucinda -- age 1 [1849], female, born MS. Living with Pleasant and Caroline Whitten.

Sept 13, 1850, Subdivision No. 22, Pg 339A, House/Family 337/342:
Lowrey, John -- age 54 [1796], Farmer, value 1,400, born SC, married in year
Lowrey, Jane -- age 52 [1798], female, born SC, no read/write
Lowrey, Letty -- age 20 [1830], female, born SC
Lowrey, Henry -- age 18 [1832], male, Farmer, born SC
Lowrey, Elizabeth -- age 16 [1834], female, born SC
Lowrey, John -- age 13 [1837], male, born SC
[MKJ Note: I believe this family's surname should be Long instead of Lowrey.]

1860 Winston County, Mississippi Census:
August 10, 1860, Louisville P.O., Page 61-62, Dwelling 384, Family 383:
Whitten, L. -- age 10 (1850), born MS. Living with P.H. and C. Whitten.

September 8, 1860, Louisville P.O., Page 97, Dwelling 634, Family 634:
Long, Jane -- female, age 58 [1802], farmer, real 4000, personal 2500, born SC
Long, H.W. -- male, age 28 [1832], born SC
Long, Jno. -- male, age 23 [1836], born SC
Bailey, Mary -- female, age 32 [1828], born SC
Bailey, Caroline -- female, age 10 [1850], born MS
Bailey, Wm H -- male, age 7 [1853], born MS
Bailey, Jno. -- male, age 4 [1856], born MS

No John & Lucinda Long found on 1870 Winston County, MS census (last searched census and index on December 2002). I have not found John and Lucinda Long on the 1880 Winston or Choctaw County, MS censuses either.

1900 Choctaw County, Mississippi Census:
June 14, 1900, Supervisor District 4, Enumeration District 33, Beat 5, Pg 337A, House/Family 107/108:
Bailey, John R. -- aged 43, widowed, born Apr. 1857
Bailey, Lennie -- aged 15, daughter, born Jan. 1884
Bailey, Minnie -- aged 12, daughter, born Aug. 1886
Bailey, Mary C. -- age unknown, mother, widowed, all 3 of her children still alive
Long, Lummie -- aged 26, female, cousin, born Nov. 1873
Long, Mary -- aged 17, female, cousin, born Apr. 1883
Car, William -- aged 23, black, servant, born Oct. 1876
---------------------------------------

East Mississippi Insane Asylum (Meridian, Mississippi), Patient Admission Registers, 1885-1926. Registry of Admissions, page 13:
Name: Mrs. Missie Long
Color: W
Date of Admission: Oct. 10, 1889
Total No.: 639
No. for Year: 94
How Sent: Jury
Sex: F
Age: 40
Domestic State: M [married]
No. of Children: 2
Occupation: Housewife
Degree of Education: Limited
Profession of Religion: None
Nativity: Miss
Residence: Winston [County]
Alleged Causes: Predisposing: [blank]
Alleged Causes: Exciting: [blank]
Form of Mental Disorder: Acute Mania
Accompanying Bodily Disorder: None
Date of Attack: [blank]
No. of Attack: 1
No. of Admission: 1
Date of Death/Discharge: Jany 6, 1890
Time in Asylum: 3 mos 7? days
Result: Discharged
Observations: Unimproved

On file at Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Jackson, Mississippi. Copies provided 2/9/2004. Comments in brackets by MKJ.
---------------------------------------

Extract From the Winston County Journal newspaper, Louisville, Mississippi (Compiled by Louis Taunton) -- Microfilm on file at Winston County Library, Louisville, Mississippi

April 3, 1896 -- "In Memoriam"

On March 13, 1896 our noble friend, Mr. Jno. Long, passed from labor to refreshment, beyond the river. He was born in Union District, S.C., July 13, 1836, became a citizen of Miss. in 1850. He united in marriage with Miss Lucinda Whitten January 22, 1867. He professed faith in Christ and was baptised into the membership of the Methodist Church about 25 years ago. A few hours before his last attack, he was engaged in cheerful conversation with a number of friends who had called to see him. He leaves two motherless girls to mourn for him. The funeral services took place on Sunday morning at Antioch Church, 3 miles from Webster, Rev. Dollar conducting the service. Tenderly and lovingly they bore his body and laid it in his grave beside his sleeping wife, to rest til the resurrection...(continued)

GENEALOGY RESOURCES

LINKS & CREDITS

| Parents and Siblings of Lucinda Whitten | Main Whitten Page | Parents and Siblings of John Long |

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